When only a bowl of Noodles & Dumplings will do…..

Nothing quite gives you the same warmth than the combination that noodles and dumplings gives you.   Add some chicken to the mix and you have yourself a cure like no other that heals, comforts you and picks you up from the inside whether you have the flu or emotional heartache; It can be quite magical.

There are so many variations of noodles and dumplings and the choice to have them in a soup or a sauce or alone that the combinations could be endless.  This is the case more-so when you realise that noodles and dumplings make an appearance in so very many cultures and cuisines.  Starting with the king of them all in my opinion…the many varieties of Chinese noodles and dumplings- the Jiaozi is one of many kinds, Jewish Matzah balls, Russian Pelmenis, Japanese Gyzoas, Tibeten/Indian Momos, Turkish Mantis, Polish Perogies, Korean Mandus, Indian Muthiya, Italian Ravioli, French Quenelles, German Knödels …and then the noodles,  rice noodles, wheat noodles, mung bean noodles, shirataki noodles, vermicelli, Spätzle,  pasta noodles, soba noodles,  udon,… my lists could go on and on, but I think the picture is clear.

Noodles and dumplings are loved by so many cultures because there simply isn’t anything else that is as comforting as these two humble foods.   And when you eat them together, they make the ultimate comfort food because no matter where you are or who you are with, you will feel like you are being taken care of; that warm, loved feeling you get when you eat whatever food your mother or grandmother prepares for you.

Pork & Coriander Dumplings with Vegetables & Soba Noodles in a Oyster, Chili & Garlic-Ginger sauce

This is a combination that I made up myself so I cannot vouch for any kind of authentic identity it may have as there are both Japanese and Chinese flavours and ingredients in here.  Nevertheless, it turned out delicious.  You should try it!

Ingredients

Serves 5-6

  • 170g Soba noodles
  • 1/2 head of cabbage finely sliced
  • 2 red peppers slices
  • 1 1/2 cups of sliced mushrooms
  • 1 small head of broccoli florets
  • 1 carrot chopped into matchsticks.
  • 2 tbsp of oil
  • 1 tbsp Oyster sauce
  • One quantity of Oyster & Chili Garlic-Ginger Sauce (recipe below)
  • Dumplings quantity of your choice.  Allow for at least 4-5 dumplings per person (recipe below)
  • 1-2 spring onions chopped
  • Sesame seeds or glazed bonito topping to sprinkle (recipe available soon!)

To assemble the dish:

  1. Boil the soba noodles in a large pan of boiling slightly salted water, when done, drain and keep to the side.
  2. In the same water add as many dumplings as you require.  Cook on a rolling boil for 4-5 mins.  They are done when they float to the surface  Drain and keep to the side.
  3. In the meantime, heat a large pan to make the sauce, when done remove sauce into a bowl and put pan back on heat without washing.
  4. Add a tbsp of oil to the pan and turn the heat up high.
  5. When hot add the vegetables (the vegetables I listed are what I had available, you can use whatever you like) one at a time stirring well between each addition starting with the carrots, then the mushrooms, the peppers, the cabbage and finally the broccoli florets.
  6. Stir in a tbsp of oyster sauce and cover with a lid for a few minutes to steam while on medium high heat.  You want the veg to still have a bite test to see when the broccoli turns greener and a little tender.
  7. Remove the lid and add the sauce.
  8. Stir well and then add the noodles and stir again.  Make sure the heat is off.
  9. Finally sprinkle the dish with the chopped spring onions, place the dumplings on top and sprinkle with sesame seeds or if you have make the bonito topping use that and enjoy!

Pork & Coriander Jiaozi  Style Dumplings  

Makes 25-30

You can make these in advance and cook them straight from the freezer so I will often double this batch just to have extra in the freezer.  They also make a quick, (4-5 minute boil in water then pan fry the flat side of the dumpling for a couple of minutes to golden) delicious pot-sticker to serve  impromptu guests.  Serve with a dipping sauce in the ratio of 2:1 soy sauce and regular rice vinegar or black vinegar,  a dash of sesame oil and optional chili oil.

The Dough:

Ingredients

You can either use ready made dumpling or wonton skin from the Asian supermarket or make your own which is worth the effort if you have the time.

  • 180g plain strong white flour (and extra for dusting)
  • Approx 75ml hot water  (add a little at a time)

Combine the water and the flour until you get a fairly firm dough and knead until smooth.  Set aside for 1/2hr to rest before making the skins by rolling out the dough to the thickness of a 10p coin/quarter (a couple of mm) and using a cookie cutter- cut out rounds.  Thin out the edges of each round slightly with a rolling pin, leaving the centre thicker, Stack the rounds with a dusting of flour between each layer to ensure they don’t stick together.  Cover with some cling film/saran wrap while you make the filling.

The Filling:

Ingredients

  • 85g good quality lean pork mince  (you can substitute with minced chicken thigh or for a vegetarian version I will be adding a recipe soon)
  • 1 cup coriander chopped finely (stems included)
  • 1-2 spring onions chopped finely (depending on the size)
  • 1 tbps grated  ginger
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic crushed
  • Light soy sauce  to taste (at least 1 tbsp)
  • 1 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 2 tsp Shao Xing wine  (or dry sherry)
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 4-5 water chestnuts chopped finely (optional for added texture)

Method

Combine all the ingredients together in a bowl ready to fill the dumpling skins.  Can be made in advance and refrigerated until ready to use.

Filling the Skins:

Take a good teaspoon of the filling and put it in the centre of one half of a dumpling skin.  Fold the other half over to create a half moon shape squeezing out the air from the filling .  If you find though edges aren’t sticking well, you can moisten one edge very lightly before joining to the half moon shape.  Secure all edges by ensuring there are no air pockets and if you like, gather the edges into little pleats thinning the edges slightly as you go around to ensure the edges are not too thick.  Place wrappers on a lightly floured plate and refrigerate until needed.

Oyster & Chili Garlic-Ginger Sauce

This sauce is very versatile.  It can be made thicker or thinner depending on what you are using it for.  It is great with bok choy, dau miu (snow pea sprouts..my favourite!), choi sum, morning glory or any other vegetables you like as well as a quick sauce for meat, poultry or fish.

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp groundnut or vegetable oil with a high smoke point
  • 1 tbsp grated ginger
  • 4-5 garlic cloves crushed
  • 1-2 long thin green chilis chopped finely (to taste)
  • 3-4 tbs good quality oyster sauce (It is possible to get a good quality vegetarian versions of this too)
  • 1 tbsp Mirin
  • 2 tbsp Shao Xing wine (or dry sherry)
  • 1- 1 & 1/2 tbsp of corn flour depending on the thickness you prefer.  Start with one and add more if you need.
  • 1 cup of water  (adjust according to preference)
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce or to taste
  • 2 tsp sesame oil

Method

  1. Put the water in a jug, mix in the cornflour until smooth and keep to the side ready to use.
  2. On high heat, heat a large wok type pan with the oil.
  3. Add the ginger, garlic and chills and fry for a minute or so.
  4. Next add the Shao Xing wine then the Mirin and stir to evaporate some of the alcohol while it boils.
  5. Next add the soy sauce, oyster sauce and sesame oil and bring to a boil.
  6. Lower the heat and add the cornflour and water.
  7. Cook this on a medium high heat until the sauce has thickened. It should be the consistency of pouring yoghurt not too thin and not to thick so as to coat the noodles and vegetables well.
  8. Taste for salt and adjust with soy sauce accordingly.
  9. If you require the sauce a little thicker or thinner add some more cornflour mixed with some water and bring to the boil to thicken or thin out with some water.
  10. Sauce can be made in advance and refrigerated until needed.


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A (small) change will do you good & My Sweet Potato Adventures with an Indian twist

Just as many of you out there, each year, as the new year draws closer I make my one of my reoccurring resolutions to live a healthier lifestyle. Full to the brim with enthusiasm and motivation,  we decide it is the optimum time to go on a “diet”, buy a gym membership, abstain from alcohol etc.  Once we pass the January Blues (January 23rd was supposedly the most depressing date this year) all this conscientious, extreme change manages to last until about mid February at the very best.

The whole point of a resolution is to follow through with something and make sure that you stick at it for the long run, right?  Very few people can adhere to strict rules and restrictions for long periods of time, and I am certainly not one of those people!  However, I do have a tendency to be passionate and obsess over anything new I get into- be it a hobby, a diet, cooking a kind of cuisine, researching a particular interest etc.  Unfortunately, I can lose interest just as easily if I get bored, or feel restricted.  What can I say?  I’m a stubborn bull and I like to do what I want to do. :) This year I decided to break the pattern.

As the new year approached, there were to be no more resolutions for me to obsess over for 2 months before I crashed and burned.  I made a decision to introduce small changes in my life that I would be happy to make, but more importantly, be able to sustain all year with the view to carrying them on indefinitely.  It meant the drastic instant results that I would usually aim for and sometimes achieve would not be happening, but I am content with this because I think the 80:20 rule fits me better than anything before:  being mindful and conscientious about what I am doing 80% of the time with that 20% of letting go bringing the balance I need.  No restrictions- just positive adjustments.  For example,  exercising regularly without the excuse of needing to go to the gym and in the kitchen, I am far more aware of not being overly excessive when it comes to fat, sugar and salt for everyday cooking.  It’s interesting to experiment and see if recipes work well with less or with interesting natural substitutes without compromising on the taste.  If not, not to worry because although with less frequency now, I will still enjoy these things and I will certainly not become fanatically against any of the things that I enjoy that may be deemed less healthy; we all know there are some things that need sugary, salty, buttery goodness! An example of this being, Kougin Amann, which I will be dedicating an entire day to make my own version in the near future!

It’s now March and I have to say that I have not felt this positive or energetic in a long time.  I feel a sense of freedom; I feel healthier and I am especially enjoying exploring and experimenting for the 80%.  The most important thing I have learnt is balance and this is slowly seeping into every aspect of my life.

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Recently, I have had quite a craving for sweet potato and I would usually just roast them or make a mash as I would regular potatoes, but the other day I decided to try them out with some Indian flavours. After rummaging in the fridge, I pulled out a fresh bag of kale and some root ginger.  I don’t know why Gobi Aloo Sabzi (A spiced dry curry of cauliflower and potato)  came to mind.  I think it was the ginger.  I love ginger in Gobi Aloo and there is a kind of sweetness that I can relate to the Aloo when then are cooked with the Gobi and ginger that I thought would work well with the sweet potato.  I thought the kale’s earthy tang would balance the sweetness of the potato just as the stalks of the cauliflower in Gobi Aloo do.  I cooked it more or less the same way I would Gobi Aloo and the result was a resounding success! The sweet potato and kale worked and balanced together beautifully with the ginger and spices.  The bonus of this dish is that it takes no longer than 15-20 mins to prepare and have ready to serve on the table.  I will certainly be cooking this colourful, nutritious and utterly more-ish version of sweet potatoes for years to come!

 Spiced Sweet Potato & Kale-  Shakarkand & Kale Subzi

This makes a good size dish that can serve up to 8 people if it is being accompanied by other dishes.  It can also be eaten alone or with rice and/or chapatti.  It’s delicious accompanied with plain yoghurt. And don’t worry about the left overs! This keeps well for a few days in the fridge.

Ingredients

  • 600g  yellow sweet potato (about 1 large or 2 small) cubed into 1-2cm cubes If you can’t find yellow, you can use white.
  • 1 tennis ball onion finely chopped
  • 1 bag of curly spring kale  (approx 180g) cavolo nero would also work well or other similar leaves
  • 25g ginger  peeled and grated
  • 1 green chili chopped finely
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 2 tbs dried fenugreek leaves ( Kasuri Methi) Avaliable in all Indian grocery stores.  If you can’t find it, you can leave it out as it is not essential
  • 2 tsp ground coriander seed powder
  • 1/4 red chilli powder (or to taste)
  • Salt to taste (about 1 1/2 tsp)
  • A few sprigs of coriander (cilantro) leaves chopped finely to garnish (optional)
  • Your choice of oil to cook with

Method

  1. Prepare all the ingredients as described above.
  2. Heat a wide based pan on medium high heat and add the cumin seeds to the dry pan.  Toss them once or twice to insure they don’t burn.  Once you start to smell the aroma from them add 3-4 tbsp of oil and let the seeds flutter.
  3. Now add the onions and green chilli and cook for a couple of minutes until the onions are slightly transparent.
  4. Add the ginger and stir for 10-20 seconds
  5. Add the spices- turmeric, red chilli,coriander and the salt and cook for about 1 min or so until you smell the rawness of the turmeric start to subside.  It will seem like the spices are sticking to the base of the pan if it is not non-stick, but don’t worry.  You don’t need to add more oil.  Just continue to stir.
  6. Now add the fenugreek leaves and stir for 10-20 seconds.
  7. Add the cubed sweet potato and stir to ensure they are coated well.
  8. Finally add the kale a handful or 2 at a time and thoroughly stir.
  9. When you have incorporated all the Kale, as you stir, bring the pan to a “boil” (put the pan on full heat for a minute) before putting a lid on it and turning the heat right down to a temperature that would be a very gentle simmer.  I say simmer, but there is no liquid in the dish and so I have given that as a reference for what temperature to use.
  10. Cook for about 10-15 mins depending on how large the pieces of sweet potato are.  The smaller they are, the quicker it will be.  Take off the lid half way and give it a stir.  The dish is cooked when the sweet potatoes are cooked.  Make sure you don’t over cook them to a mush, they are nicer when they still hold their shape.

Garnish and serve.

Bon  Appetit!