A (small) change will do you good & My Sweet Potato Adventures with an Indian twist

Just as many of you out there, each year, as the new year draws closer I make my one of my reoccurring resolutions to live a healthier lifestyle. Full to the brim with enthusiasm and motivation,  we decide it is the optimum time to go on a “diet”, buy a gym membership, abstain from alcohol etc.  Once we pass the January Blues (January 23rd was supposedly the most depressing date this year) all this conscientious, extreme change manages to last until about mid February at the very best.

The whole point of a resolution is to follow through with something and make sure that you stick at it for the long run, right?  Very few people can adhere to strict rules and restrictions for long periods of time, and I am certainly not one of those people!  However, I do have a tendency to be passionate and obsess over anything new I get into- be it a hobby, a diet, cooking a kind of cuisine, researching a particular interest etc.  Unfortunately, I can lose interest just as easily if I get bored, or feel restricted.  What can I say?  I’m a stubborn bull and I like to do what I want to do. :) This year I decided to break the pattern.

As the new year approached, there were to be no more resolutions for me to obsess over for 2 months before I crashed and burned.  I made a decision to introduce small changes in my life that I would be happy to make, but more importantly, be able to sustain all year with the view to carrying them on indefinitely.  It meant the drastic instant results that I would usually aim for and sometimes achieve would not be happening, but I am content with this because I think the 80:20 rule fits me better than anything before:  being mindful and conscientious about what I am doing 80% of the time with that 20% of letting go bringing the balance I need.  No restrictions- just positive adjustments.  For example,  exercising regularly without the excuse of needing to go to the gym and in the kitchen, I am far more aware of not being overly excessive when it comes to fat, sugar and salt for everyday cooking.  It’s interesting to experiment and see if recipes work well with less or with interesting natural substitutes without compromising on the taste.  If not, not to worry because although with less frequency now, I will still enjoy these things and I will certainly not become fanatically against any of the things that I enjoy that may be deemed less healthy; we all know there are some things that need sugary, salty, buttery goodness! An example of this being, Kougin Amann, which I will be dedicating an entire day to make my own version in the near future!

It’s now March and I have to say that I have not felt this positive or energetic in a long time.  I feel a sense of freedom; I feel healthier and I am especially enjoying exploring and experimenting for the 80%.  The most important thing I have learnt is balance and this is slowly seeping into every aspect of my life.

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Recently, I have had quite a craving for sweet potato and I would usually just roast them or make a mash as I would regular potatoes, but the other day I decided to try them out with some Indian flavours. After rummaging in the fridge, I pulled out a fresh bag of kale and some root ginger.  I don’t know why Gobi Aloo Sabzi (A spiced dry curry of cauliflower and potato)  came to mind.  I think it was the ginger.  I love ginger in Gobi Aloo and there is a kind of sweetness that I can relate to the Aloo when then are cooked with the Gobi and ginger that I thought would work well with the sweet potato.  I thought the kale’s earthy tang would balance the sweetness of the potato just as the stalks of the cauliflower in Gobi Aloo do.  I cooked it more or less the same way I would Gobi Aloo and the result was a resounding success! The sweet potato and kale worked and balanced together beautifully with the ginger and spices.  The bonus of this dish is that it takes no longer than 15-20 mins to prepare and have ready to serve on the table.  I will certainly be cooking this colourful, nutritious and utterly more-ish version of sweet potatoes for years to come!

 Spiced Sweet Potato & Kale-  Shakarkand & Kale Subzi

This makes a good size dish that can serve up to 8 people if it is being accompanied by other dishes.  It can also be eaten alone or with rice and/or chapatti.  It’s delicious accompanied with plain yoghurt. And don’t worry about the left overs! This keeps well for a few days in the fridge.

Ingredients

  • 600g  yellow sweet potato (about 1 large or 2 small) cubed into 1-2cm cubes If you can’t find yellow, you can use white.
  • 1 tennis ball onion finely chopped
  • 1 bag of curly spring kale  (approx 180g) cavolo nero would also work well or other similar leaves
  • 25g ginger  peeled and grated
  • 1 green chili chopped finely
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 2 tbs dried fenugreek leaves ( Kasuri Methi) Avaliable in all Indian grocery stores.  If you can’t find it, you can leave it out as it is not essential
  • 2 tsp ground coriander seed powder
  • 1/4 red chilli powder (or to taste)
  • Salt to taste (about 1 1/2 tsp)
  • A few sprigs of coriander (cilantro) leaves chopped finely to garnish (optional)
  • Your choice of oil to cook with

Method

  1. Prepare all the ingredients as described above.
  2. Heat a wide based pan on medium high heat and add the cumin seeds to the dry pan.  Toss them once or twice to insure they don’t burn.  Once you start to smell the aroma from them add 3-4 tbsp of oil and let the seeds flutter.
  3. Now add the onions and green chilli and cook for a couple of minutes until the onions are slightly transparent.
  4. Add the ginger and stir for 10-20 seconds
  5. Add the spices- turmeric, red chilli,coriander and the salt and cook for about 1 min or so until you smell the rawness of the turmeric start to subside.  It will seem like the spices are sticking to the base of the pan if it is not non-stick, but don’t worry.  You don’t need to add more oil.  Just continue to stir.
  6. Now add the fenugreek leaves and stir for 10-20 seconds.
  7. Add the cubed sweet potato and stir to ensure they are coated well.
  8. Finally add the kale a handful or 2 at a time and thoroughly stir.
  9. When you have incorporated all the Kale, as you stir, bring the pan to a “boil” (put the pan on full heat for a minute) before putting a lid on it and turning the heat right down to a temperature that would be a very gentle simmer.  I say simmer, but there is no liquid in the dish and so I have given that as a reference for what temperature to use.
  10. Cook for about 10-15 mins depending on how large the pieces of sweet potato are.  The smaller they are, the quicker it will be.  Take off the lid half way and give it a stir.  The dish is cooked when the sweet potatoes are cooked.  Make sure you don’t over cook them to a mush, they are nicer when they still hold their shape.

Garnish and serve.

Bon  Appetit!

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